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CF 100, the First Canuck (CF 100, B25 Mtichell and Vampire)

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Ground Crew Support-Aviano (CF 18)

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Aviation Art Gallery

"CF-100, The First Canuck"

Description: This painting depicts the prototype of the Canadian designed and built CF-100 AVRO Canuck, all weather jet fighter flying over the AVRO factory in Malton, Ontario on one of its first test flights. Flying alongside is an RCAF Vampire jet fighter chase plane and a B-25 Mitchell photographic support aircraft recording the flight for analysis afterwards.

Medium: Acrylic on stretched canvas, 18x24(1997)
Display: RCAF display Okanagan Military Museum (2003). Artist's collection.

Historical note:

CANADA'S FIRST JET FIGHTER
Although the British designed and built Vampire was in RCAF service as a frontline jet fighter prior to the introduction of the big AVRO jet fighter, the Canuck, as the CF-100, was known was the first Canadian designed and built jet fighter to enter service. Its famous replacement was to have been the AVRO Arrow which, though spectacular in flight trials, never entered operational service due to the program being cancelled by the government of the day. As it was, the CF-100 saw extensive service in the Canadian and Belgian air forces. It was a rugged, all-weather capable fighter with the performance to meet the challenges of the era. As jet fighter developments escalated in cost and complexity however, it became increasingly obsolescent. That said, it served Canada's air force well over the period of its operational service which extended into the 1980s.

For more information go to:
Warplane Heritage site

 

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